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Liechtenstein

sunny 20 °C

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Liechtenstein is a nation of clubbers. According to the tourist board, "clubs play a major role in everyday life, with over 600 of them" spread across the country. This may help to explain why the place is so empty during the day, with the local crowd sleeping off the night before. Perhaps they're all inside furiously gobbling up the national dish, ribel – some form of semolina-like slop, in an attempt to sober up.

I took the short trip to Liechtenstein from Zurich with friend and work colleague, Jack. We were to attend a conference in Zurich the following day and so drove east beforehand. Surprisingly, no one else at the conference had done the same, and most people I spoke to thought it strange that we had bothered.

Liechtenstein shares a valley with Switzerland and if you happen to ski down the wrong hill, you'll end up in Austria. We hit the main street, being also one of the only streets in the capital Vaduz, and headed towards the cathedral. As this was under construction, we sat down in a particularly deserted part of town and tried to work out where the main square was hiding. A quick google search for images of the main square revealed that we were in fact already sitting in it. As there was simply no one about and not much to do, we turned back. A couple of obligatory pork products and a local (Swiss) beer later, we headed off on a circular walk, via the city's castle.

Cow bells sounded all around as the early evening mist descended into the valley and the locals presumably got ready for another massive night in one of the many clubs to be found all over this land. There was just enough time left for Jack to very nearly run down a pedestrian and for me to leave my phone in the locked car before posting the rental car keys into the deposit box. On to the next one.

Posted by Peter.Moules 13:10 Archived in Liechtenstein Tagged liechtenstein

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